Jade Logistics makes the case for mobile apps in ports

World Cargo News recently talked to us about the launch of our suite of new mobile apps. The article is reproduced below.

Jade Logistics has launched a suite of 30 new web-based hand-held mobile apps for its Master Terminal TOS. The apps deploy mobile functionality and data capture ability to any internet-connected mobile device running the Microsoft, Android or Apple operating systems.

With the new apps, Jade is ready to support ports’ deployment of TOS functionality at different levels to different roles on the terminal, without requiring proprietary ruggedised devices that it views as expensive and lacking flexibility.

The apps include a vehicle app for mobile equipment operators. Depending on the task, and the driver’s preference, various views are available including a graphical view and a list view. Among other features, users can toggle night mode, select twinmode and customise the app to display the most important information in the most prominent areas on screen.

Like all the Jade apps, the Vehicle app is updated at the server level, so there are no software updates needed at the device level to maintain the app.

Delphine Ducaruge, product manager, said the need for 30 different apps reflects the diversity of specific roles at marine terminals, and each app is for a specific purpose, such as truck checking at a gate, or reefer container monitoring. There is, she added, no risk that the number of apps could become a source of frustration to people on the ground using the Jade Master Terminal TOS. An administrator decides who has access to what apps, and most users will typically have access to only “a couple”, and will stay in a single app for several hours while they work.

Grupo CICE in Veracruz was part of the beta programme to test the new Master Terminal web-based mobile apps. “The suite of 30 web apps spans CICE’s entire port operation, from splitting and merging cargo, through to loading or unloading a truck, and replaces their long-serving Windows applications,” stated Jade. “CICE, who are forwardthinking technology enthusiasts, rigorously tested the new apps over a two-month period, working closely with Jade Logistics to ensure the functionality developed would deliver real benefits to their port.”

Genaro Mendez, director of information technology at CICE commented that the new web-based apps were a welcome addition to the company. “Today’s terminals must be more responsive,” he said. “They must adapt to new technology quickly to remain competitive. We recognised the benefits the web apps would deliver, and made the decision to upgrade as soon as they were released.”

The ability to use commodity hardware also resonated with CICE. “We no longer need to invest in expensive ruggedised equipment. Today’s readily available and inexpensive tablets and smartphones, with a supported web browser, are all that is required to use the apps,” said Mendez.

Using smartphones, tablets or laptops instead of so-called ruggedised devices challenges the conventional wisdom about the working environment in ports. As WorldCargo News has discussed previously, ports often purchase expensive ruggedised devices with high IP and Mil-Spec ratings that have proved to be more durable in industrial applications.

However, the gap between ruggedised and commodity devices has closed significantly in recent years (the iPhone 8 is rated to IP67, for example), and cases/covers can be used for extra protection.

Jade believes its apps can replace mobile computers connected to a TOS, across virtually the whole terminal. The STS cranes are the exception, and Ducaruge noted that, for safety reasons, “ports don’t want to add extra technology to the STS cranes”…

Published World Cargo News: November 2017.

Mobile Apps in action at CICE in Mexico

Jade Logistics recently released a suite of web-based mobile apps. The apps were put through rigorous testing by our customers, including CICE, a mixed cargo port in Mexico who have now implemented them across their operation.

We recently caught up with CICE to see how the apps are performing on their terminals.

Mobile computing in ports set to accelerate with positive global outlook

Introducing innovations like mobile apps to port operations is one way to achieve productivity gains, improve operational decision-making and maximize revenue opportunities.

Optimism is rising across ports around the globe, on the back of growth in trade and increasing freight rates. For ports it is time to look at ways to apply innovation that will capitalize on this positive growth.

According to a recent article in Port Strategy, world trade is expected to increase from 2.2% growth in 2016 to 3.8% in 2017, with a similar level of expansion forecast for 2018. The article also cited growth in freight rates for Maersk in Asia as a positive reflection of that growth translating into more freight movement.

Port leaders around the world will be looking at how they can position their port to benefit from this growth. Introducing innovations like mobile apps to port operations is one way to achieve productivity gains, improve operational decision-making and maximize revenue opportunities.

While many industries have been aggressively adopting modern mobile apps based on commodity-priced hardware, the port sector has been more cautious. According to port consultant Thomas Vitsounis, writing in Port Strategy:

“In general terms, the use of apps will change the industry and everyone knows that. When it comes to ports themselves, things have so far moved slowly – but there has been a remarkable change. . . . in the past year, it is tremendous how quickly this industry has shifted. Ports are now thinking in these terms. There is some distance to go but it is absolutely essential to move in that direction.”

There are some exciting opportunities to leverage this in your port by applying mobile technology in areas like cargo management, yard logistics, reefer management or rail service integration.

Some risks also exist though: in terms of choosing the best mobile app technology, the right support partner and successfully integrating a mobile approach into your existing IT systems, especially your TOS.

Jade Logistics have prepared a white paper “There’s an app for that” looking at the issues around mobility in ports, and what to consider when building your business case.

Also read the press release about Mexican based Grupo CICE testing and implementing the Master Terminal suite of handheld apps.

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Jade Logistics launches suite of mobile apps

Published on Breakbulk.com  June 18, 2017

Jade has announced the release of 30 new handheld apps to put more power in the hands of its users.

Running on any modern tablet or smartphone with a supported web browser, the handheld apps will give users on the terminal greater flexibility. Events are recorded in real time, allowing a terminal to make informed business decisions, provide accurate reporting and ultimately offer better customer service. For more information, view our handheld apps fact sheet.

Read the full article on the Breakbulk.com website.

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World Cargo News talk to Jade’s Kaustubh Dalvi about the recent installation of Master Terminal at Abu Dhabi Ports

Jade Logistics has successfully gone live with its terminal operating system (TOS), Master Terminal, at three of seven sites for Abu Dhabi Ports  (ADP).

ADP is replacing legacy systems with Master Terminal for its mixed cargo operations. The first site to go live was Zayed port in July, after a six-month implementation phase. It was followed by Khalifa (1 August) and Musaffah (6 September). The remaining four terminals are expected to go live in 2016.

Speaking with World Cargo News, Jade’s director of business development, Captain Kaustubh Dalvi, said the changeover to JMT is a comprehensive undertaking, with Jade installing a new server family within ADP’s existing infrastructure.

Dalvi said a common challenge at general cargo terminals is the lack of standardisation of data that can be exchanged electronically. “This limits the port community to take full advantage of the pre-advising and pre-planning functionality, which is available in our TOS,” he said. However, ADP is a forward-thinking organisation in this respect, and will use EDI for general cargo, which is something not all terminals in the general cargo business do. Port agents were trained to supply manifests, load and discharge information in standardised format. “As a result, cargo is now electronically declared 24 hours in advance of arrival using EDI,” said Dalvi.

The ADP project includes a suite of Master Terminal mobile applications and a web portal. The portal will allow stakeholders to access information using cargo queries and self-service reporting, and/or register pre-notifications, truck appointments request for services, etc.

Master Terminal has a multi-terminal architecture, and all the terminals will be hosted at a single physical location. The transition to Jade will be managed by running the new software in parallel with legacy systems at each terminal’s go-live. “We typically commence the parallel run a couple of weeks prior to the actual go-live, to minimise downtime and potential disruption,” said Dalvi. He also emphasised the importance of ADP’s project team and super users in ensuring a successful go-live, particularly in avoiding bottlenecks, as the team brings seven terminals live with the new TOS. The remaining four facilities are expected to go live in 2016.