C3 Limited duotone image looking between piles of logs at a ship docked at port.

Finding a perfect operating fit for every size

Published by Port Strategy March 2019

Jade Logistics’ Kaustubh Dalvi talks to Port Strategy about the importance of finding a TOS that suits the business requirements, and how the TOS is the core of a port’s operation from which they can provide enhanced levels of efficiency to all stakeholders across their port community.

Smaller Terminal Operating System (TOS) solutions have plenty to offer without the high costs of the big players, says Martin Rushmere.

Adaptability and flexibility plus cost savings are expected today from terminal operating systems. Customers are looking beyond the original wonders that dazzled ports, IT and computing power, to applying the same programme and platform across different cargoes and terminals. Yet a perception still lingers that the software and equipment needed (especially dedicated on-site servers) means a costly and complicated package.

Richard Willis, port operations technical director of Royal HaskoningDHV, puts it this way. “Well-established vendors have a deep range of product functionality, tailored over many years to their clients’ needs, gradually standardising process and creating standard working practices.” He cautions that the installation of a new system “always needs some degree of business change from a non-systemised operation to manage cargo flows and when adopting a well-established TOS the terminal client is recommended to align their practices with the standard product features, to capture the benefits of using the toolkit features. “This is often a sensible approach” says Mr Willis, “but some terminals who have more specialised local needs or variations may benefit from using a TOS company that can be more flexible and engage in product customisations to shape around the client requirements.”

Miami-based Cetus Labs, which has a total of just nine people, is one such TOS provider that bears this in mind, through its Octopi platform. Catering to mixed ports and container terminals of less than 500,000 TEU a year, the system is linked through Amazon Web Services. “Every feature is in the Cloud,” says Miles Varghese, head of sales, “which gives tremendous flexibility, speed of implementation and low cost of installation. Implementation takes four to six months.”

The company sees itself as “the Gmail of TOS”. One of the strategic priorities is to tailor the system to what the customer wants. “We innovate the data to what the customer wants and do not try to convince the terminal operator to buy a readymade product. “We guarantee 99.9% of uptime,” adds Mr Varghese, “and have a huge advantage in being totally based on the Cloud. Caribbean Port Services in Haiti is a customer and Octopi kept working even when that terrible Hurricane Matthew devastated the island.”

Cetus has an iron rule of installing and providing a feature specially requested by a customer only if it can be used by all customers. “We will be up front and we are not going to build something that is not scalable,” says Mr Varghese, “and if it is scalable, we will often install it for free.” Maintenance and repair features have been added, which Cetus says are usually outside the scope of products from large providers, and berthing areas usage/analysis functions have been developed in response to customer needs.

CHALLENGING THE STATUS QUO
Mr Willis sees the marketplace dominated by a few leading companies, but smaller and start-up companies like Cetus are challenging around the periphery, specialising in particular regions or in certain cargo operations, and these companies “cater for those terminals that don’t fit the standard or want to take a more ambitious route to differentiate from local competition perhaps”.

Smaller terminals (arbitrarily 500,000 TEU and less) tend to do a mixture of cargo types and need a TOS that is designed to both manage the cargo variety properly and to equip the terminal with the ability to show greater flexibility to their customers.

“The reality in the market is that although some suppliers may cover the complete range, the buyer should look carefully at the nature of their customers when making a buying decision because each occupies a segment in which they are naturally much better,” says Allan Jones of International Terminal Solutions (ITS). “There are systems that do a better job for the requirements of the smaller terminal,” he adds. “Look for open TOS systems that can communicate with other systems; the TOS is an element of your automation, business intelligence and Internet of Things strategy and will need to work in synergy with specialist systems in this area.”

New Zealand-based Jade sees the TOS as the core of a port’s operation, and the platform from which a port can provide enhanced levels of efficiency to all stakeholders across their port community. President of global sales, Kaustubh Dalvi, notes that from its beginnings in the early 1990s, Jade’s Master Terminal “was designed as a turn-key solution for a marine terminal operator to handle multiple cargo types and have 24/7 support”.

TECH QUESTIONS
All vendors agree that it’s essential to stay abreast of the latest technology, but they disagree on which aspects to concentrate on. Blockchain is possibly the area of most uncertainty.

“We tell clients not to take blockchain too seriously”, says Cetus’ Mr Varghese. “The main focus is to get rid of pen and paper and move to digital methods.”

Jade takes a different view. “Platforms such as this will play a key role in the future of collaboration and sharing of information among supply chain actors. While blockchain is still in its infancy with respect to its place in the global supply chain, Master Terminal already integrates with the CargoChain information sharing platform which utilises blockchain as a means of proofing that all information stored is accurate and unaltered.”

Royal HaskoningDHV’s Mr Willis says the future of technology in terminals will be influenced by pressures from outside the terminal too, with environmental impact and closer supply chain collaboration being important. “Technology, particularly around process automation, machine-led decision making and remote-control equipment, is leading the way, with other cargo terminals learning from this sector and implementing their own solutions tailored to different cargo types. “However,” says Mr Willis, “within bulks particularly, automated operations have been well-established for many years, using equipment control in unmanned operations, with sophisticated stock management and sensor usage.” He sees huge potential from smart ports initiatives for Royal HaskoningDHV’s clients, from data capture and predictive analysis, innovative decision-making support and driving forward a lower-cost, lower-impact operation with the use of technology tools right across the port.

ITS’ Mr Jones believes that a key criterion should be how well the TOS can talk to other systems. “These terms are traditionally associated with larger terminals, but now all have their place in smaller terminals.” He points to the big advances in data availability – even in relatively small operations – and this is only set to increase with IoT. “As an example,” he says, “we have just completed implementation of our PortSpective system in a 250,000 TEU terminal. The system uses our IoT platform on the cargo handling equipment to track it in real-time to provide visualisations of the state of the operation, identify and highlight operational, engineering and safety issues instantly as they occur, and provide very detailed real-time data for both operations and engineering business analysis.”

For Cetus, a principal business approach is to deal with clients that Mr Varghese terms “forward thinking, who can see five to 10 years ahead. We are not comfortable with the ‘if it isn’t broken, don’t fix it’ philosophy.”

View the full article here on Port Strategy.

Container Management talks to Jade Logistics’ Kaustubh Dalvi about TOS adaptability – One size does not fit all

Published by Container Management January/February 2019

Container Management talks to Jade Logistics’ Kaustubh Dalvi about the importance of adaptability in ensuring the successful implementation of new terminal operating systems.

“An in-house terminal operating system (TOS) offers its user full control of both the technical and financial aspects of its operations but, to quote the late Stan Lee, “With great power comes great responsibility.”

Speaking with Container Management, along with T.J. Rucker, President of Tideworks, Mehmet Ali Kayaoglu, CEO of GullsEye and Scott Peoples of Navis, Captain Kaustubh Dalvi (pictured above) emphasized the importance of a robust implementation methodology in a successful implementation. He also offers his opinion on the move towards digitalisation in the maritime industry and the value in sharing data.

Read excerpts below or view the full article.

“Another company that relies heavily on planning to guarantee a successful go-live is New Zealand-based third party vendor Jade Logistics Group, which follows a robust methodology when it implements its own TOS at a new site. First, it begins with the project analysis, then it configures the inside of the system and finally it migrates the data and initiates a go-live. Kaustubh Dalvi, the company’s President of Global Sales, said that it focuses a lot on the planning analysis phase to give users as much visibility as possible on what is going to happen. The company also aims to collaborate on a day-to-day basis to ensure that the go-live remains on track.

MOVE TOWARDS DIGITALISATION

“Recently, a tsunami of digitalisation has hit the market, with blockchain initiatives and artificial intelligence (AI) developments aplenty.

“With all this new technology making waves in the industry, it may be high time that the maritime sector learned to share. Other industries happily share and sometimes even trade data to help fuel innovation, yet companies in the maritime industry have yet to latch onto this way of thinking. Dalvi explained that all this new technology is useless without data and, in order to be successful, data sharing is the key. He told CM: “It’s like buying a Ferrari, keeping it in the garage and not using it.” Dalvi believes that the more data is shared, the more valuable it becomes.

“Jade Logistics as a whole is very keen on data sharing, and in December 2018 it launched CargoChain, its own information sharing platform for the global supply chain. According to CargoChain CEO David Lindsay: “Today’s consumers are demanding trust while those involved in the supply chain require full transparency and visibility.” The platform aims to provide this by integrating blockchain technology and sharing trusted information amongst all actors in the supply chain. CargoChain targets issues of data sharing across the global supply chain and, by providing its platform to application developer communities, aspires to “allow developers to solve the world’s supply

“Dalvi has started to see data sharing happen within the maritime sector and hopes that it will become a much bigger thing in the future. To further encourage the flow of data, he suggested that some of the larger players in the supply chain should start practising what he called “data philanthropy”. This involves companies giving away data for experimentation and innovation, but it is something that is not seen currently in the industry. Still, Dalvi hopes that this will change, as he believes that people have begun to learn and to see the value of sharing data.”

View the full article here on Container Management.

hands shaking

Jade Logistics makes a blockchain move

Published by WorldCargo News September 13, 2018

Geneva-based CargoChain has developed a cargo information sharing platform that is focused on information sharing though the development of cost effective and rapidly deployable applications, including blockchain. CargoChain was formed out of Jade Logistics, but has been set up as and operates as a separate, independent company.

hands shaking

“CargoChain’s blockchain solution includes a unique Information Sharing Protocol and deep supply chain functionality that provides the ability to share any type of data, without the restrictions of legacy technology like EDI. The CargoChain Platform also provides tools that allow developers to build and deploy cost-effective applications that solve supply chain problems of any size,” the companies stated.

Tony Davis, Director of Marketing, Jade Logistics Group, explains that all rich cargo information is stored ‘off-chain’ on the CargoChain Platform. “Using Hyperledger Fabric technology, CargoChain stores a hash of all cargo events ‘on-chain’ to their own public blockchain. This approach mitigates the scalability challenges of blockchain when faced with large volumes of rich data, while at the same time providing complete trust in all the information that is stored on the CargoChain Platform.”

Guirec Le Bars, Chief Technology Officer at CargoChain is backing the company to revolutionise supply chain data sharing. “We believe the partnership will revolutionise the way cargo information is shared between global supply chain participants. It will enable the secure distribution of rich cargo information among trusted partners which has previously been unavailable, until now,” he said.

For Jade Logistics, increased collaboration and access to a common set of cargo information are crucial as the logistics industry seeks to drive greater efficiencies and productivity. “With Jade Logistics’ Master Terminal TOS in operation at over 125 terminals worldwide, Jade Logistics and CargoChain are well positioned to play a major role in this exciting new era of global logistics. Both companies will work closely with Jade Logistics’ existing Master Terminal customer base, and their business partners, to assist with their information sharing needs. Initial CargoChain applications are already in development for specific Master Terminal customers as well as pilots for significant supply chain projects.

“As independent players in the industry, Jade Logistics and CargoChain are committed to contributing to a democratised supply chain, that encourages across-the-board collaboration, seamless information sharing, and innovation,” Jade Logistics concluded.

View the original release here on WorldCargo News.

Jade Logistics’ Master Terminal returns to Breakbulk Americas 2018

Breakbulk Americas 2018 is a fantastic event for the logistics industry, bringing together shippers and suppliers from around the world.

Jade Logistics are exhibiting at Breakbulk Americas from 2-4 October, 2018, in at the George Brown Convention Centre in Houston, Texas, USA.

You’ll find us at booth 1305, so make sure you stop by to meet the team and see the world’s leading terminal operating system—Master Terminal—for mixed cargo ports, in action. Discover how Master Terminal helps ports and terminal operators around the world manage their mixed cargo requirements, the easy way.

If you want to make sure you don’t miss a Master Terminal demonstration, please schedule a time with us here.

We look forward to seeing you there!
Kaustubh Dalvi, Keith McSwain and Jay Kronberg

ship docked at night

Jade Logistics moves into SE Asia with Pelindo 1 win

Published by WorldCargo News July 6, 2018

Jade Logistics has won a contract to install its Master Terminal TOS at 14 terminals in Indonesia operated by Pelindo I.

ship docked at night

The contract is a major win for Jade Logistics, and its first in SE Asia. “PT Pelabuhan Indonesia I (Pelindo I) has selected the terminal operating system (TOS), Master Terminal, from Jade Logistics, to manage their mixed cargo operations at 14 terminals in the provinces of Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam (Aceh), Sumatera Utara (North Sumatra), Riau, and Riau Islands (Kepulauan Riau). Master Terminal will replace Pelindo I’s legacy systems and will help modernize and optimize their terminal operations,” Jade stated.

The roll out will take place in stages over an 18-month period. The first three terminals in the process of implementing Master Terminal are at the ports of Dumai, Sibolga, and Malahayati, and are set to go live by the third quarter of 2018, with the remaining terminals live by mid 2019.

With a large number of multi purpose terminals, Indonesia is a good fit for Jade’s multi-cargo TOS, which will support the 14 different terminals from a single instance of Master Terminal. After Jade Logistics was spun out from Jade Software Corporation (JSC) last year the company, led by CEO David Lindsay, has pursued an aggressive growth strategy that includes pushing into new markets. Before winning this contract it set up an office in Jakarta.

Commenting on winning the contract with Pelindo I, Jade said: “In support of the Indonesian Government’s Maritime port infrastructure upgrade program, dubbed the Indonesian-sea-toll-road program, Pelindo I (one of four Indonesian state-owned port operators) sought an integrated TOS that supported multiple cargo types and facilities to grow alongside the business. Master Terminal was a clear frontrunner, with a proven track record of handling a mixture of break-bulk, bulk, container and Roll-On/Roll-Off (RORO) cargo. Key functionality such as the ability to integrate with the Government Customs system, InaPortNet, and an SAP finance system, were features that won Pelindo I over”.

Pelindo I has a vision is to become the leading Port Business in Indonesia. “Investing in state-of-the- art technology, such as the Master Terminal application, supplemented with improved operational processes, training, and equipment, will ensure Pelindo I is in a position to handle current and future cargo volumes more efficiently and more cost-effectively,” Jade added.

“We are thrilled to partner with Pelindo I on this project,” remarked Lindsay. “The opportunities for them in this region are immense and we’re looking forward to seeing their coastal hubs, industry and economy grow. We’re excited to play a part in Indonesia’s greater expansion plans and seeing what the future holds.”

View Jade Logistics’ media release here.

port at night

Jade Logistics on a new path

Jade Logistics CEO, David Lindsay, recently spoke to WorldCargo News about the new path for Jade Logistics, which is experiencing fast growth on a global level.

The article is reproduced below.

Now that Jade Logistics has been spun off from Jade Software Corporation (JSC), the company is looking to grow aggressively as it targets the multi-cargo terminal sector.

port at night

As reported previously, JSC underwent a corporate restructuring last year, with the UK’s Skipton Building Society buying out founder Sir Gill Simpson and USA Health Investors LLC. Jade’s port and transport business was spun out of JSC as Jade Logistics, which is now owned by USA Health Investors.

Speaking with WorldCargo News, David Lindsay, CEO of Jade Logistics, said the changes were driven by a need for “shareholder realignment” behind the strategies of the different divisions. One side of Jade Logistics’ business was focused on digital applications in commerce and finance, while the other was focused firmly on the port and logistics business. Skipton was looking for a slower, more conservative growth path in commercial applications, while the port and logistics business was experiencing faster growth on a global level. Dividing the company put the digital business of Jade with banking sector shareholders, while Jade Logistics is now owned by a software investor.

Lindsay stressed that the change is positive for Jade Logistics. It wants Master Terminal to be the number one TOS solution for multi-cargo terminals, and is targeting revenue growth of 30-50%. USA Health Investors is, said Lindsay, supporting Jade Logistics with both “financial and intellectual” commitment.

Jade Logistics’ owners are backing its strategy, which will require capital for both development work and expansion of the overseas sales and support network. There are no plans to take the Jade Logistics headquarters out of Christchurch, New Zealand, but there will be significant offshore expansion, Lindsay explained.

Jade Logistics will continue to base Master Terminal on the core JADE language and back-end environment, which it now licenses from Jade Software (along with 50-60 other software firms). At the same time, Jade Logistics will continue to focus on making the functionality in Master Terminal accessible to users outside of administrators, using mobile apps. This, Lindsay added, will mean development work will increasingly be in ‘conventional’ languages like C#, JavaScript and HTML. Jade Logistics has previously launched a series of mobile apps that have been well received. For the future it plans to focus on visibility and helping customers share more rich information beyond the terminal.

In the industry today, continued Lindsay, “there are real impediments, in terms of the amount of data or what you can share”, and Jade Logistics believes that there is a lot of value in building out the ability to share more data beyond the terminal.

While the technology will evolve, Jade Logistics’ core market will remain the multi-cargo sector. Lindsay acknowledged that this space is getting more competitive, but he believes Master Terminal has a significant advantage, as it was developed from the outset for multi-cargo terminals, with a data model that can write down to the level of individual products inside a container. That multi-cargo functionality is still helping win business today, including a new contract from one of Indonesia’s state-owned port operating companies to roll out Master Terminal at 14 terminals across one region. Master Terminal has multi-terminal functionality, and each terminal will be set up as a separate business of Master Terminal running within one instance of the TOS, allowing a single view of operations.

The number of terminals running Master Terminal has increased significantly in the last three years, and now numbers 126, including Hamad Port in Qatar which is operating at over 1M TEU a year, with a further 20 implementations underway. Lindsay says that this pace is sustainable, and Jade Logistics’ record for deployment is rolling out Master Terminal at 17 terminals for one customer in Australia in 10 months, while implementing other projects at the same time. “We are proud of that, and we don’t think anyone else can do it,” concluded Lindsay.

View the original article here.

computer render of Jade Logistics booth at TOC Europe 2018

Jade Logistics showcasing Master Terminal at TOC Europe 2018

TOC Europe is the leading event for container and cargo supply chain professionals across Europe. The conference showcases excellence in port and terminal operations around the world.

Jade Logistics are exhibiting at TOC Europe from 12-14 June.   The conference is taking place at the Ahoy Conference Centre in Rotterdam. We will be at Stand C100, come meet with our team and let them show you how you can streamline your operations with our TOS, Master Terminal.

Master Terminal has been specifically designed to manage mixed cargo and is helping ports and terminal operators all around the world manage their cargo requirements.

Make sure you also make time to visit the Tech TOC presentations,  bringing together terminal operators and users to discuss current industry challenges.

Vincent Macheda, General Manager – Systems & Strategy from Australian Amalgamated Terminals (AAT) will be on the speaking panel, he will be discussing how his company used Master Terminal to meet their particular port challenges.
Join Vincent’s session Tuesday 12th June – 14:45-16:00 – “Operating Smarter – Case Studies”

We are also booking appointment times to meet with our team, if you would like to schedule your slot, get in touch with us here.

Master Terminal goes live at first port in Pakistan

Published by WorldCargo News April 12, 2018

Jade Logistics’ terminal operating system (TOS), Master Terminal, has successfully gone live at Pakistan International Bulk Terminal Ltd (PIBTL).

Demonstrating its true “mixed cargo” credentials, PIBTL has implemented Master Terminal for managing its coal, cement and clinker terminal at Port Qasim. PIBTL has invested some US$285M developing the facility, which is touted as the first and only common user dry bulk facility in Pakistan, capable of handling 12 Mtpa of coal, with an average discharge rate of over 30,000 tons per day.

“PIBTL’s vision is to transform the port infrastructure through investment in the latest technologies, such as Master Terminal, and the best global standards for handling cargo. Its goal is to strive for excellence, and to build world-class port infrastructure in the country”, stated Sharique Azim Siddiqui, CEO of PIBTL.

Jade Logistics has long promoted Master Terminal as a true mixed cargo capable TOS, and PIBTL said it this was a factor in picking the software for its new facility.

“We identified Master Terminal as the leading TOS in the mixed cargo market. We will use it to optimize workflows across our operation,” said Sharique Azim Siddiqui. “Master Terminal’s comprehensive EDI capabilities, ability to interface to other systems, and sound implementation reputation gave us the confidence that it would more than meet the needs of our busy port.”

PIBTL has also implemented Jade Logistics’ Harbor Management software for berth scheduling and management of its harbor operations.

Salman Zulfikar, Senior Consulting Manager for Jade Logistics commented, “Entry into the South Asia market further enhances Master Terminal’s reputation as the world’s number one TOS for mixed cargo ports. The project was well supported by the PIBTL management, as well as the operations, finance and IT users. A combination of state-of-the-art bulk-only technologies, and the integration of Master Terminal with core weighing processes, were key to a successful implementation.”

Jade Logistics makes the case for mobile apps in ports

World Cargo News recently talked to us about the launch of our suite of new mobile apps. The article is reproduced below.

Jade Logistics has launched a suite of 30 new web-based hand-held mobile apps for its Master Terminal TOS. The apps deploy mobile functionality and data capture ability to any internet-connected mobile device running the Microsoft, Android or Apple operating systems.

With the new apps, Jade is ready to support ports’ deployment of TOS functionality at different levels to different roles on the terminal, without requiring proprietary ruggedised devices that it views as expensive and lacking flexibility.

The apps include a vehicle app for mobile equipment operators. Depending on the task, and the driver’s preference, various views are available including a graphical view and a list view. Among other features, users can toggle night mode, select twinmode and customise the app to display the most important information in the most prominent areas on screen.

Like all the Jade apps, the Vehicle app is updated at the server level, so there are no software updates needed at the device level to maintain the app.

Delphine Ducaruge, product manager, said the need for 30 different apps reflects the diversity of specific roles at marine terminals, and each app is for a specific purpose, such as truck checking at a gate, or reefer container monitoring. There is, she added, no risk that the number of apps could become a source of frustration to people on the ground using the Jade Master Terminal TOS. An administrator decides who has access to what apps, and most users will typically have access to only “a couple”, and will stay in a single app for several hours while they work.

Grupo CICE in Veracruz was part of the beta programme to test the new Master Terminal web-based mobile apps. “The suite of 30 web apps spans CICE’s entire port operation, from splitting and merging cargo, through to loading or unloading a truck, and replaces their long-serving Windows applications,” stated Jade. “CICE, who are forwardthinking technology enthusiasts, rigorously tested the new apps over a two-month period, working closely with Jade Logistics to ensure the functionality developed would deliver real benefits to their port.”

Genaro Mendez, director of information technology at CICE commented that the new web-based apps were a welcome addition to the company. “Today’s terminals must be more responsive,” he said. “They must adapt to new technology quickly to remain competitive. We recognised the benefits the web apps would deliver, and made the decision to upgrade as soon as they were released.”

The ability to use commodity hardware also resonated with CICE. “We no longer need to invest in expensive ruggedised equipment. Today’s readily available and inexpensive tablets and smartphones, with a supported web browser, are all that is required to use the apps,” said Mendez.

Using smartphones, tablets or laptops instead of so-called ruggedised devices challenges the conventional wisdom about the working environment in ports. As WorldCargo News has discussed previously, ports often purchase expensive ruggedised devices with high IP and Mil-Spec ratings that have proved to be more durable in industrial applications.

However, the gap between ruggedised and commodity devices has closed significantly in recent years (the iPhone 8 is rated to IP67, for example), and cases/covers can be used for extra protection.

Jade believes its apps can replace mobile computers connected to a TOS, across virtually the whole terminal. The STS cranes are the exception, and Ducaruge noted that, for safety reasons, “ports don’t want to add extra technology to the STS cranes”…

Published World Cargo News: November 2017.

Sunset over the ocean in Australia

Jade Logistics continues impressive implementation record

Software company Jade Logistics, supplier of the world’s number one terminal operating system (TOS) for mixed cargo ports, has continued to increase its global footprint by implementing its Master Terminal product at 22 sites in 2017.

On the back of significant sales growth and what has been a record year for the company, Jade Logistics’ global implementation team achieved go-live at terminals across multiple geographic locations including Europe, the Americas, Australasia, and the Middle East. This impressive result was underpinned by a substantial Australasian project in which 16 terminals went live in less than ten months, and was complemented by an eight-week implementation of a multi-purpose terminal on the eastern coast of the UAE.

Chief Executive Officer of Jade Logistics, David Lindsay said, “We are well aware of the importance of getting our clients live as soon as possible, allowing them to quickly experience the benefits of a world class Terminal Operating System. “The implementation times achieved during 2017 are exceptional, and are delivering real value to customers in terms of lowering their total cost of ownership.”

Adding to the varied geographic locations, the terminals represent a diverse range of cargo types including pure bulk terminals, break bulk and Roll-On/Roll-Off (RORO) terminals, and container-only terminals, one of which is handling over one million TEUs per annum.

Jade Logistics Director of Global Services, Mark Ginnever says, “The key to any successful implementation is a dedicated project team, comprising representatives from both organisations.”

“The importance of strong client ownership and committed super users cannot be stressed enough, and we have been fortunate enough to work with clients that understand and support this collaborative approach,” added Ginnever.

Master Terminal is now licensed to over 110 terminals around the world, and Jade Logistics’ growth is set to continue with strong sales forecast into 2018 and beyond.